Livestock Traceability Regulations - Feedback

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To comply with the National PIC Business Rules and to ensure the PIC register is regularly updated with property information which is crucial in the event of an emergency animal disease outbreak, NRE Tas is considering the introduction of a system whereby PICs would need to be renewed every 3 years.







PICs are currently required for properties where cattle, sheep, goats, or pigs are held in captivity. These are not the only species susceptible to disease outbreaks.




   



There is an option for NRE Tas to charge a fee for PIC applications and renewals as a partial cost recovery mechanism for the administration of the primary produce traceability program.

Note: If fees were to be applied to PICs, the cost would be $71.20 for an initial application and $35.50 for a renewal, paid every 3 years (as at FY2023/24).







To improve biosecurity management in event of a disease outbreak, NRE Tas is considering only allowing the consolidation of multiple properties under one PIC to occur if the properties are contiguous or by special permission of the Secretary.







To improve biosecurity management in event of a disease outbreak, NRE Tas is considering issuing individual PICs to different enterprises operating on the same premises or land (as opposed to each enterprise sharing the same PIC).










Note: Detailed requirements on how to correctly identify livestock are in the animal identification standards






















To comply with a nationally harmonised traceability framework, improve our biosecurity management and protect our international markets, NRE Tas is considering removing the bobby calf eID tag exemption. This would mean that from 1 January 2025, bobby calves would need an eID before moving off property.










NRE Tas is considering making the application of earmarks voluntary (it is currently mandatory to earmark all cattle before they reach 6 months of age).

Note: earmarking is no longer used as a biosecurity traceability tool, therefore there is no legislative requirement to mandate this practice for biosecurity tracing purposes.










Tasmania is transitioning to mandatory eID for sheep to comply with a nationally harmonised traceability framework, improve our biosecurity management and protect our international markets. This means that from 1 January 2025, all sheep born on or after that date must have an eID before moving off property, and from 1 January 2027, all sheep must have an eID before moving off property (regardless of their age).







NRE Tas is considering permitting the use of generic yellow NLIS accredited breeder devices. This would mean sheep owners could choose between applying a year-of-birth colour coded breeder device or a generic yellow breeder device.







NRE Tas is considering making the application of earmarks voluntary (it is currently mandatory to earmark all sheep before they reach 6 months of age).

Note: earmarking is no longer used as a biosecurity traceability tool, therefore there is no legislative requirement to mandate this practice for biosecurity tracing purposes.










Tasmania is transitioning to mandatory eID for goats to comply with a nationally harmonised traceability framework, improve our biosecurity management and protect our international markets. This means that from 1 January 2025, all goats born on or after that date must have an eID before moving off property, and from 1 January 2027, all goats must have an eID before moving off property (regardless of their age).







NRE Tas is considering permitting the use of generic yellow NLIS accredited breeder devices. This would mean goat owners could choose between applying a year-of-birth colour coded breeder device or a generic yellow breeder device.







NRE Tas is considering removing the dairy goat tag exemption. This would mean that from 1 January 2025, all dairy goats would require an NLIS accredited device before moving off property.

Note: NRE Tas acknowledges there are welfare and sizing issues associated with applying tags and leg bands to some breeds. Standard 1.3.1 seeks to address these issues by enabling the movement of unidentified goats through a permit system if owners can demonstrate that the application of a NLIS device would negatively impact goat welfare.










NRE Tas is considering introducing mandatory identification for pigs aged 10 weeks and under when they move off property (currently identification is only required for pigs older then 10 weeks of age).







NRE Tas proposes that the form of identification for pigs aged 10 weeks and under would be an NLIS accredited ear tag.




NRE Tas is considering permitting the use of NLIS accredited ear tags for use in pigs older than 10 weeks of age (currently the only approved form of identification is a body tattoo).







NRE Tas is considering changing the tattoo threshold measure from age to bodyweight. Currently, pigs aged 10 weeks or older require a body tattoo before moving off property. NRE Tas is considering changing this to pigs 25kg or heavier to require a body tattoo before moving off property.

Note: this change is being considered to bring Tasmania in line with the NLIS Pig Standards and other jurisdictions that all use bodyweight as the threshold indicator.










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