Desexing and Microchipping

From 1 March 2022 the Cat Management Act 2009 requires all cats over the age of four months to be microchipped and desexed.

Desexing

A desexed cat typically lives longer and is less territorial. It will wander, fight, and spray-mark its territory less, and in general makes a better pet. Desexing also prevents unwanted litters of kittens that contribute to the stray and feral cat population and to the ongoing demise of native wildlife.

From 1 March 2022, the owner of a cat that is more than four months of age must ensure that the cat is desexed by a veterinary surgeon. This requirement does not apply to:
  • A cat that has been assessed by a veterinary surgeon and a certificate/letter has been issued for that cat stating that to desex the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat. The certificate/letter must indicate if this is for the life of the cat or until the cat reaches a particular age; or
  • A cat owned for the purpose of breeding by a registered breeder, or the holder of a cat breeding permit in relation to the cat; or
  • A cat that is a member of a prescribed class of cats.
The National Desexing Network​ (NDN) is a nationwide referral system to help those in financial need with the cost of desexing their pets. To find out more visit their website National Desexi​ng Network​​.

For more information on desexing requirements for the sale of a cat, go to our ​webpage Breeding, Selling and Buying Ca​ts​.

How do I know if a cat is desexed?

A cat that is desexed is to be identified by a prescribed permanent mark inside the left ear.

Microchipping

Pet cats that are microchipped can be identified from feral and stray cats by local councils and animal shelters. This means they can be quickly and safely returned to you if they get injured or lost.

Microchips, implanted under a cat's skin, are about the size of a grain of rice and use a unique identification number to identify you as your cat's owner. This makes it faster and easier for you to be reunited with your cat if your cat is missing.

From 1 March 2022, all cats over four months of age must be implanted with a microchip. This does not apply to a cat which has been assessed by a veterinary surgeon and a certificate/letter has been issued for that cat stating that the implantation of a microchip in the cat may adversely affect the health and welfare of the cat.

For more information on microchipping requirements for the sale of a cat, please see our webpage Breeding, Selling and Buying Ca​ts.

​Who can implant a microchip in a cat?

The Cat Management Regulations 2012​ allows for the following persons to implant a microchip in a cat:
  • A registered veterinary surgeon;
  • A person who has successfully completed an approved course in the implantation of microchips;
  • A person recognised by the Agency Secretary as having at least 12 months experience in the implantation of microchips in cats.

Will the State Government be subsidising the cost of microchipping and desexing?

No. Microchipping and desexing are the responsibility of the owner of the cat. Discounted microchipping and desexing of cats are offered at a number of vets and Cat Management Facilities​across Tasmania.​

Contact

Invasive Species Branch
Phone: 03 6165 3777
Email: invasivespecies@nre.tas.gov.au